Ten most beautiful English idioms that will decorate your speech - ForumDaily
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Ten of the most beautiful English idioms that will decorate your speech

Idioms, or set expressions, replacing a long description with a vivid image that everyone can understand, make speech lively and emotional. LiveOnEnglish offers 10 of the most beautiful English idioms to remember.

Graffiti: "go and inspire yourself" on a wall.

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The British and Americans simply adore set expressions and insert them into conversations literally through a sentence. Here is a selection of 10 idioms that will help you show off your knowledge of the English language. 300+ simple phrases that will take your English to the next level, see here.

10. What goes around comes around

You are probably familiar with the song of the same name by American singer Justin Timberlake.

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This expression can be translated as “what you sow, so will you reap” or “as it comes around, so it will respond.” Read about how the 10 most popular English idioms came to be in our article.

Example: People say: what goes around comes around. So, be careful (People say: what goes around comes around. So be careful).

9. Variety is the spice of life

This idiom can be translated as “the beauty of life is its diversity.”

Example: My mother was always saying that variety is a spice of life, so I shouldn't stop moving forward (My mother always said that the beauty of life is its variety, so I shouldn't stop moving forward).

8. Every cloud has a silver lining

In Russian there is an equivalent to this idiom - “every cloud has a silver lining.” In every unpleasant situation you should always look for the positive.

Example:

- Yesterday I lost my phone (Yesterday I lost my phone).
— Don't worry. Every cloud has a silver lining. Now you can buy a new one you've always wanted (Don't worry. Every cloud has a silver lining. Now you can buy the new one you've always dreamed of).

7. People who are not throw stones

You shouldn’t judge other people for their bad character traits if you yourself are the same. This is something akin to “seeing a straw in someone else’s eye, but not noticing a log in your own.”

Example: Susan says that Carla is jealous, but Susan is more jealous herself. People who live in glass houses should not throw stones (Susan says that Carla is jealous, but Susan herself is even more jealous. People see a straw in someone else’s eye, but don’t notice a log in their own).

6. Burn your bridges

Again, the expression familiar to us all is “burning bridges,” that is, taking irrevocable steps.

Example: If you drop out of the university now, you'll burn your bridges behind you (If you drop out of the university now, you'll burn all the bridges behind you).

5. Burning the midnight oil

Literally, “burning the midnight oil” is a situation familiar to all students, which means “staying late, studying hard, working hard.”

Example: Jim has to burn the midnight oil to pass that exam (Jim will have to stay up late to pass this exam).

4. Water under the bridge

This English idiom is interpreted as “what has happened has passed.” That is, the problems and troubles that happen to us should remain in the past.

Example: It was terrible that your car was stolen, but it is water under the bridge now, so you must move forward (It’s terrible that your car was stolen, but what happened is past, so you must move forward).

3. Wear your heart on your sleeve

Express your feelings, and don’t hide them in your “sleeves” - this is the meaning of this phrase.

Example: He's a kind of guy who wears his heart on his sleeve (He's one of those guys who doesn't hide his feelings).

2. It takes two to tango

As you know, tango can only be danced by two people, so the meaning of this expression is that if an unpleasant situation occurred where two people were involved, then “two people are responsible.”

Example: She blames Sarah for stealing her husband. But anyway it takes two to tango (She accuses Sarah of stealing her husband. But in any case, two are always to blame).

1. Two's company; three's a crowd

Where there are two, there is a third one. Or simply “the third one is extra.”

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Example: The couple wanted to go on holiday with their friend but two's company, three's a crowd, so none of them were able to enjoy themselves (The couple wanted to go on holiday with their friend, but, as they say, the third is a wheel, so none of them I was able to rest).

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